Location: Beautiful mix of desert and sea: Archipiélago Chinijo Natural Park [MAP]
Size: About 4 kilometers long.
Access: Very simple for the main expanse of beach. Via bumpy dirt road for more secluded parts.
Services: Lifeguard in summer.

 

If it’s true that certain places have a special energy, then Famara is definitely one of them. It may be the mist that often surrounds it, or the constant crash of the waves, or the cliffs, or the desert that keeps it isolated… It is no coincidence that César Manrique, the artist who revealed the beauty of Lanzarote to the world, credits his childhood spent in Famara with being the inspiration behind his artistic sensibility.

Beach life varies depending on the time of day or the time of year. At the first light of day or sunset you’ll usually see walkers or runners going up and down its four kilometres of coastline. The ideal time to enjoy it to the fullest is at low tide; when the sun is already up, especially from June to September when it’s the bathers who take over the beach. During the months of July and August, however, the beach loses some of its privacy as it tends to get invaded by individual surfers and surf schools who place themselves at anytime and anywhere along the beach. Kitesurfers try to distance themselves from areas frequented by bathers and they usually stick to the northern part which is accessed via a dirt track behind the Playa Famara Bungalows. This area is also popular with nudists.

After a day at the beach, there’s nothing better than trying a fresh fish dish in one of the many restaurants in Caleta de Famara, or simply admiring the sunsets from El Rincón at the north end of the beach, undoubtedly a special place in a special place…

Eat + drink: There is a variety of good fish restaurants in the village as well as open air bars and cafés with a strong surfing vibe..
Pros: The stunning landscapes, the length of the beach and the possibility of surfing and kitesurfing, the nudist area..
Cons: Frequent wind. Possibility of strong currents if you go out too far from the shore.